Clin Surg | Volume 5, Issue 1 | Case Series | Open Access

Ortner’s Syndrome: Review of Literature and Report on Four Patients with Hoarseness

Austin Berry J* and Cherie-Ann O Nathan

Otolaryngology PGY-1, LSU Health Shreveport, USA

*Correspondance to: Austin Berry J 

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Abstract

Hoarseness, commonly referred to as dysphonia, is one of the most common speech-related complaints presented to otolaryngologists. Although used interchangeably, these terms represent two different diagnoses. Hoarseness refers to a change in voice quality noticed by the patient, while dysphonia refers to a change in voice quality observed by the physician [1]. Unique amongst the myriad of potential causes of vocal dysfunction is Ortner’s Syndrome, also known as Cardiovocal Syndrome. This syndrome was first described in 1897 by Dr. Norbert Ortner in three patients with mitral valve disease. Ortner’s Syndrome historically refers to left Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve (RLN) palsy due to a cardiac etiology, clinically presenting as hoarseness. This report discusses four patients with hoarseness due to Ortner’s Syndrome - three cases caused by aortic aneurysm and one case caused an enlarged Pulmonary Artery (Pa).

Citation:

Austin Berry J, Cherie-Ann O Nathan. Ortner’s Syndrome: Review of Literature and Report on Four Patients with Hoarseness. Clin Surg. 2020; 5: 2906..

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