Clin Surg | Volume 6, Issue 1 | Case Report | Open Access

Two-year Follow-up after Operative Treatment of an Osseous Bankart Lesion with Flap-Detached Cartilage Lesion of the Glenoid Associated with Absorption of the Glenoid Surface: A Case Report

Masayoshi Saito1 , Atsushi Tasaki1*, Tomoshige Tamaki1 , Taiki Nozaki2 , Wataru Morita3 , Tomoyuki Mochizuki4 and Nobuto Kitamura1

1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Luke?s International Hospital, Japan 2 Department of Radiology, St. Luke?s International Hospital, Japan 3 Nuffield Department of Orthopedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Botnar Research Centre, University of Oxford, UK 4 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tokyo North Medical Center, Japan

*Correspondance to: Atsushi Tasaki 

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Abstract

Background: Glenoid articular cartilage lesion is a rare complication following traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder. Purpose: We report on the case of a 14-year-old male rugby player with traumatic anterior shoulder instability with an extensive flapped lesion on the glenoid articular cartilage with an osseous Bankart lesion. Method: Arthroscopic findings revealed that the glenoid cartilage was flapped over, extending from the anteroinferior to the center. Repair of the osseous Bankart lesion using suture anchors and resection of the unstable peripheral part of the cartilage was performed arthroscopically. The main region of the injured articular surface was left untouched. Result: During postoperative follow-up, absorption of the glenoid articular surface near the suture anchor holes was identified. Arthroscopic examination three months post-surgery showed that the flap-detached lesion of the residual cartilage was stable and appeared adapted on the glenoid surface. The resected area was covered by fibrous tissue. A follow-up Computed Tomography (CT) scan revealed that the osseous lesion was united, and the patient returned to the previous sports level four months following the operation. At the 2-year-follow-up, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) revealed that the glenoid surface was remodeled to a flattened round shape with no signs of osteoarthritis, exhibiting proper conformity of the joint surfaces to the humeral head. Conclusion: Arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors may cause bone resorption at the glenoid surface and the stabilized glenohumeral joint following surgery in young patients with anterior shoulder instability and may lead to remodeling of the glenoid surface from the damaged glenoid cartilage lesion

Keywords:

Anterior instability; Shoulder; Articular cartilage lesion; Arthroscopic; Bankart repair; Rugby

Citation:

Saito M, Tasaki A, Tamaki T, Nozaki T, Morita W, Mochizuki T, et al. Two-year Follow-up after Operative Treatment of an Osseous Bankart Lesion with Flap-Detached Cartilage Lesion of the Glenoid Associated with Absorption of the Glenoid Surface: A Case Report. Clin Surg. 2021; 6: 3024.

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